Former Navy SEAL Takes His Expertise to the Prepping Community

What do you do when you have some of the toughest and most sophisticated training in the world, have experience using it in combat in Iraq and other hotspots in the world, but think the next hotspot might be within our own borders?

You prepare.  “The problem with that,” says Randy Kelley, “is that any team is more powerful and capable than any one individual in a crisis situation”.   He should know, Randy was a SEAL in the Navy for 11 years before starting a company that helped his former community with their training and special equipment needs.

As a SEAL, one of his specialties was intelligence on and off the battlefield, which allowed him to see some clouds on the horizon a few years ago.  Some are economic, some are cultural, some political, some are conflict-driven, and some are natural.  They all add up, however, to a very bad storm headed our way.

“I feel a little crazy sometimes, since we’ve lived in a country of peace and prosperity my whole life.   Yet, I know the mechanics of conflict and I’ve seen it the theater of war.  It’s indisputable that our country is headed for a very ugly few years, if not a decade.” Randy says.

On a battlefield, technology, strategy, strength in numbers and skill are the determinants of a winner in warfare.  “The same thing is necessary for normal everyday folks to weather any possible crisis in the future” he states.  That is exactly what he is doing with that knowledge and skill-namely helping families prepare for an unknown, but not-so-rosy, future.

With his background in business, mixed with his specialized “conflict mediation” skills, he started a training program in San Diego last summer to fulfill his strategy of bring real skills to those who saw the same future as him, or at least intuited it.

“The funny thing is that people focus on my warfare skills and yet we’ve identified 11 other domains that people need to take care of to be prepared for crisis. All of them must be taken care of or failure will occur, and in the SEAL teams, failure was never an option.”, he says.

“If the strategy is to take care of those domains, then the philosophy that directs the strategy is to be ready and be responsible for my family and friends, even if they may not see what we do.  We have to know why we are doing something,” he states.

Not everyone agrees with him either.  Many think that we are in a normal recession and things will get better somehow.  They may also think that the government will be there to take care of them if disaster strikes.

“Good luck with that train of thought”, Randy says, “The only sure future is the one you make and even that isn’t guaranteed.  I for one won’t rely on anyone or any entity that isn’t fully incentivized to help me or my family survive.   My experiences overseas support that view“

His team’s new program, called “Ready 5”, teaches skills, in person, to folks who need teachers and uses the best instructors he could find in food storage and preparation, engineering, martial arts, mobility and of course firearms ownership and skill.  Randy is the lead instructor on that piece, since as a SEAL Sniper; he knows a thing or two on getting a bullet where it needs to go.

“As humans, every action we do is oriented towards survival, either as a being or as a species, so teaching these skills is coherent in context of a future we can foresee.  What isn’t coherent,” He says, “is living like everything is going to be just fine when any one of us can read the headlines and know deep down that life is about to change.”

For more information about the Ready 5 program, visit their website at www.ready-five.com.

Canning, The New (Old) Way to Preserve a Bounty

It all started with a peach tree. We moved into our lovely new home and little did I know that the cute dwarf tree in the yard would produce a bounty. Late that summer we were inundated with hundred of peaches. Now you can only make so many peach smoothies, peach pies and of course peach margaritas, so what to do with all the extras?

This led me down the road to canning. A great way to preserve your fresh produce for a later time, or put a cute piece of fabric on top of the lid  and give away for a gift (I’m all about cute and crafty).

Canning does require spending a lot of time over a very hot stove, but there is something incredibly rewarding about opening a jar of bright red tomato sauce or a pint of sweet golden peach jam in the dead of winter. The tastes of summer brighten the short, dark days of winter (even here in sunny San Diego).

In order to avoid poisoning your family and friends, you will need to follow a recipe closely. If this is something you are interested in, I’d strongly suggest buying or borrowing a canning and preserving cookbook. A good beginner book is Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving at Amazon.com.

As I have traveled through the maze of water-bath canning, pressure canning, hot pack vs. cold pack, I have run across some very informative websites and even a “National Can it Forward” day. It’s too bad I missed it last August. Also, take a look at the Canning Across America site:  http://www.canningacrossamerica.com/

I’m continuing my exploration of what I can grow and can. Hope you will too. Join the Canvolution!

-Laura

This Wednesday (Dec 7th) at the Ready 5 facility, Laura will be teaching a beginning class on canning.  The class begins at 6pm and will include plenty of hands-on.  For directions, please visit the Ready 5 website.  At Ready 5, the very first class in a complementary as we are confident that you will want to become a member!

The Magic of Medicine

As humans we all have this innate, hardwired impulse to survive and to eschew pain. Since this is so critical to us, we search for and put great faith in the knowledge and discourse of medicine.   Since time began, this search has been a part of human existence.

 

Thousands of years ago medicine men were given great honor for taking care of us and making us feel better.  Even today, we have great respect for doctors, nurses and the discourse of medicine.  Some may say we take if for granted too. Maybe we do.  Have we lost a little respect for these learned and committed professionals? Probably.

 

What will happen though, when access to this knowledge, people, and medicine is interrupted through crisis or disaster? What will we do?  How will we take care of our ailing child, or mother, or wife?

 

I suspect we will gain a new respect for medical professionals then. We will also begin to learn some of these skills ourselves. The internet and the explosion of information now enable us to learn some of the skills necessary to treat many problems.  Obviously, not all of them though.  We will always need professionals.

 

As a domain of concern of Ready 5, “Medicine” is the ability to do what we can on our own, prepare for the time when access is diminished and to build a network to take care of our families medically. We teach others to store medicines and materials, learn CPR and First Aid, and to learn basic medical skills like suturing (class will be held on this tonight: http://www.ready-five.com/ready-five-class-schedule/ready-five-class-schedule.aspx).

 

There will be a time when people will be suffering and cannot easily find help. It’s just a matter of time.  Learn and capture the skills, knowledge, and networks now to take care of yourself and your family.   Here are some of my favorite links to get you started…

 

http://www.survivinghealthy.com/

http://armageddonmedicine.net/

http://www.webmd.com/

http://hesperian.org/books-and-resources/

http://www.ready-five.com