Using Triathlons, Mud Runs, and Other Races to Prepare for Crisis

This last weekend I participated in my first triathlon.  As a 40-something with 2 kids and several businesses to run, it was a challenge to find time to train. On top of that, I’m a prepper. But alas, I thought, why not mix it all together and take care of all the concerns?

As it happened, I got the flu and then pneumonia, which abated a full 24 hrs before the race.  After 4 weeks of coughing and not training, my wonderful wife said, “Why don’t you just go watch?”  She had this fear I might end up on the trail in coughing fits.  I have to admit, I did too.   I followed through with the race, however, for very philosophical reasons.   As a prepper, you see, I believe that when crisis occurs, it won’t happen when I am ready.

As I got ready and learned about the race and process, I couldn’t help but see the benefits and parallels to preparing for crisis.  Let’s explore them and start with the parallels:

1. Consequences:  An event will happen and it will affect you.  Your preparation in the past will determine how it will turn out for you.  If you forget your socks for the bike and run, you will get blisters.  If you forget to store canning lids, you won’t be able to can your vegetables.  I’m sure you can imagine much worse consequences of not properly preparing for crisis.

2. Reality hits:  The race is on a certain day.  The earthquake knocked out power for 4 days.  It doesn’t matter if you are “ready” or not.  You are now in the mix.   It’s time for action.  There is no option to say no or “postpone” it.

3. Pain and discomfort will be standard fare:  OK, complain for 1 minute and suck it up the rest of the time.

4. Food and water make the body go:  The more that is available, the better!  Just make sure it’s good for the body and that you actually have it.

5. You really have to think about the future:  What will it be like to come out of the water and transition to a bike ride?  How can I lay gear down in order to move faster?  What will I do when my neighbors come to my house asking for food after disaster?  The list really goes on and on here, mostly for crisis preparation, since we don’t know EXACTLY what will happen.  Thinking through skills and equipment are the keys here.

6. Recovery is very important and better if done quickly:  In crisis, the faster you accept the shock of what happened and what needs to happen, the faster you can prepare a plan and accomplish it.  For the race, I kept thinking how would I do if I had to fight some zombies once I finished the race.

Those are the major parallels that jumped out at me.  Now let’s explore the benefits of these types of races:

1.  Committing to running a race forces you to confront the fact that you must prepare in order to lessen the pain and suffering of the race.  It focuses your mind to see into the future, speculating on what is needed to succeed, and designing a program to build your capacity to finish the race without killing yourself. If forces you to action!

*If you think about it, most humans don’t move to action unless they are forced to.  We are lazy by nature.  By paying a little money and promising yourself that you will finish a race, you use the power of force, or more specifically, consequences, to get your butt up of the couch.  What a cool tool!

2.   You are getting into shape so you are able to act better when crisis, disaster or chaos ensues.   This is a no-brainer.  That’s why this is one of the fundamental domains of preparation in the Ready 5 program.   If any of the 11 fundamental domains is not taken care of, you will feel pain and possibly die.  Yes, it sounds melodramatic, but those are the logical consequences and you/we cannot deny them.

3.  It helps build the skill of preparing.  This is a skill and practice is necessary to build competency (see my previous blog) in any skill.  How you think ahead, buy gear, test it out, practice with it, take care of it, and build a program of building race-specific skills (running, biking, swimming, etc) will help to build your capability to prepare.

4.  You can choose to go-it-alone or get help with a team, coaches, friends and the like.  I can tell you that in the prepper’s world, you want a team- and a good one!  Take that principle and apply it to a race- for example a mud run- and enter, train and complete the race as a team.  You will learn a lot about teamwork and the pros and cons of it.  Better yet, you will be building experience in teamwork, which we all need…

5. By varying the type of races (i.e. mud runs, triathlons, 5ks, swims, bikes, etc) you are building your endurance, strength, and power in all of your different muscle systems.   This is very important in preparing, as we never really know what crisis will affect our lives and how we need to react to it.  It also keeps us from over-working specific muscle systems as well as keeps boredom at bay.

In conclusion, races are a powerful, effective, and low-cost way to trigger our lazy butts to get up and prepare in multiple domains.  It’s consistent with and supportive of a prepper’s objectives and may indeed save your life one day.  Take away all the seriousness of this post and heck; these races are just plain fun!   Now, what race are you going to do next?

Randy

Physical Fitness in a Crisis

Why do you workout?

Why don’t you workout?

These two questions should really bug the crap out of you.  Why? Because most people who don’t ask them and answer them honestly spend time, energy, money and lost opportunities doing what may not be what they are really after.

Let’s start with the first question.

If you work out to lose weight and look good, great!  That means you are in the market for someone of the opposite sex.  That is, in fact, one of our most basic drives as humans. We are all attracted to sexy bodies and working out to lose weight to build muscle does that for us. I have no beef with this.

If you workout to stay “healthy”, what does that mean.  Let me guess. No injuries, strong heart, no excess weight, and to keep your energy level high. What are your goals then?  How do you orient around them?  Do you attain your goals? Consistently?  My experience here is that most people fail at this when this is their goal. Why?  Because it really isn’t a defined and realistic goal.

Now, consider a new goal.  Consider that a crisis is coming, that you may need to fight for your life, or your kid’s life.  Tell yourself that it IS going to happen, and the only thing to keep you or your kids/wife/husband alive is your ability to do something.  Like drag them from a burning car. Carry them to the hospital.  Run from gunfire. Carry 5 gallons of water from the lake (40 lbs). Pull your kids out of the ruble of a collapsed building.

If you really imagined these things, does it really motivate you to work out?  It does for me!  I know I have three lives that depend of my actions right now. In a crisis, I had better have the strength, endurance, flexibility, and mindset to help them. With that motivation, I practice the workouts that most simulate these actions and build up my capability. Crossfit comes to mind, but there are other options too. Here’s a link to another blog on the topic.  http://www.survivalblog.com/2011/07/letter_re_physical_fitness_for_1.html

If you don’t workout.  How can anyone rely on you?